Flap Procedures

DIEP (Deep Inferior Epigastric Perforator)

DIEP flap breast reconstruction uses the patient’s lower tummy skin and fat to reconstruct a breast after a mastectomy. The tissue is transplanted to the chest wall using microsurgery and shaped to form a breast.

Unlike its predecessor, the TRAM flap, the DIEP does not use any abdominal muscles–only skin and fat are used (like a Tummy Tuck). By sparing the muscles, patients experience fewer complications (like bulging or hernia), less pain, and heal faster after surgery.

Contrary to patients undergoing implant reconstruction, patients undergoing DIEP flap enjoy a soft, warm, natural breast that will never need to be replaced. Patient may also be candidates for sensory nerve reconstruction which, when performed in conjunction with DIEP flap, helps restore breast sensation lost after the mastectomy.

Diep reconstruction is not suitable for all women, particularly those who are planning to have children, or have very little body fat. Recovery is longer than other methods of reconstruction such, as Direct to Implant but there is rarely a need for any further surgery once healed.

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TUG (Transvers Upper Gracilis)

TUG flap breast reconstruction uses skin, fat and part of the gracilis muscle from the inner portion of the upper thigh to reconstruct a breast after a mastectomy.  The tissue is transplanted to the chest wall using microsurgery and shaped to form a warm, soft, and natural breast.

Even though the gracilis muscles is used, patients do not usually experience any noticeable impairment in leg function or strength.

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TRAM (Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous)

TRAM flap breast reconstruction uses skin, fat and muscle taken from the abdominal wall and used in the reconstruction of a breast after mastectomy. As with the flap procedures above, the result is a soft, warm breast, using a woman own tissue.

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